Shampoo Licenses

TDLR recommends abolishing shampoo licenses

During the recent Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR) strategic planning process, we received feedback from the public and the cosmetology industry about eliminating the shampoo apprentice permit required under Sec. 1602.267 of the Cosmetology Law and Sec. 1601.261 of the Barbering Law, and the shampoo certificate as defined in Sec. 83.20(e) of the Cosmetology Administrative Rules and Sec. 82.20(j) of the Barbering Administrative Rules. One of our ‚ÄúStreamlining Regulations Initiatives‚ÄĚ is to consider eliminating the barber and cosmetology shampoo permits and certificates, as identified on page 41 of the TDLR Strategic Plan for 2013-2017, which can be viewed at http://www.license.state.tx.us/StratPlan/2013/stratplan2013.pdf.

We stand ready to discuss how we can further develop these ideas, and we welcome any suggestions from all interested parties.

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  1. Comment
    Rep. Bill Callegari

    I would like to thank the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation for contributing this idea. The Texas Red Tape Challenge asks what we can do to streamline and reduce the burden of our regulations, and TDLR has provided a useful answer. I am particularly appreciative of how this idea pinpoints the specific provisions in the Occupations Code that would need to be amended to make this idea work. One of the underlying ideas behind the Texas Red Tape Challenge is to get participants to look at the specific laws involved (which we provide links to) and focus the discussion on how those statutes could be reformed for the better in the 83rd Session. Lastly, this project is open to everyone, and welcomes input from our state agencies too. I have always encouraged state agencies to bring their good ideas forward, and would like to thank Bill Kuntz and TDLR for being a leader in this regard.

  2. Comment
    Jeremy B. Mazur
    ( Moderator )

    For the purpose of discussion, this is a bill draft that would abolish the regulation of shampoo licenses in the Occupations Code. You can find the draft above under the "Attachments" heading. As written, the draft eliminates the licenses for shampooists, and amends the definitions of barbering and cosmetology to exclude shampooing. The purpose of the Challenge is to encourage discussion (not just votes) on how these regulations could be changed. Towards that end, please share your thoughts on this draft and what changes, if any, would you recommend. Again, this bill draft is being introduced here to encourage discussion and collaboration on this idea.

  3. Comment
    squiresb

    It is absurd to believe that in order to shampoo hair any type of certificate or license is required. Sounds like another way for the State to make money from license fees.

  4. Comment
    bigdemps

    I can think of no good reason to require someone to hold a license in order to wash my hair. Please eliminate this useless regulation.

  5. Comment
    KL2112

    Great idea. And an interesting report from TDLR. For a $24 million/year state agency that issues 155 different types of licenses, offering to eliminate the shampooing license isn't exactly an overwhelming reform measure but its another brick in the wall. Let's keep going, there are a dozen more on page 7 that need to go this session. Looks like cosmotology is the largest license program at TDLR. I never once asked my barber if he had a license. I found him through the reviews on Yelp.

  6. Comment
    leamon51

    As a hairdresser, I see no need for a license. If the salon is not providing good service, let the public do the talking.